The Greenhouse,

is about growing matters, focusing on my greenhouse and potager. I grow mainly vegetables, herbs and spices but flowers have their given place too. From seed to table, this is the nursery for my living food, we cook a lot of delicious food and I say a potager is the cook’s best friend. The greenhouse makes it possible to grow essential, colourful, warmth loving fruit and vegetables even in this climate such as tomatoes and chillies. My main blog is Tyras Trädgård/Tyra's Garden. View my profile

Tuesday

Syringa vulgaris - Lilacs

This post, 'Syringa vulgaris' - was originally uploaded and written by Tyra at the blog The greenhouse in Tyra's Garden http://tyras-greenhouse.blogspot.com/ABC Wednesday this week it is S for ...Syrén or Syringa vulgaris in latin.




In Swedish we call them Farmer Lilacs (Bondsyrener) I guess they are called that because they are so easy to grow here and everyone can afford them and they are easy to propagate as well. Here at Engarn Village I think all the gardens got them and along the village road there are a lot as well.

The last thing I did yeasterday evening was to cut the lawn and that is so wonderful to do when the fruit trees and the Lilacs are all in bloom, the scents are wonderful. Pure joy to ride around on the lawn mower listening to good music and breathing the evening air and scents. This picture of the greenhouse is from this very morning when I was catching my S for this week. Syringa vulgaris.
...

Garden History
Lilacs— both Syringa vulgaris and S. x persica, the finer, smaller "Persian Lilac", now considered a natural hybrid— were introduced into European gardens at the end of the sixteenth century, from Ottoman gardens, not through botanists exploring the Balkan habitats of S. vulgaris. The Holy Roman Emperor's ambassador, Ogier Ghiselin de Busbecq, is generally credited with supplying lilac slips to Carolus Clusius, about 1562. Well-connected botanists, like the great herbalist John Gerard, soon had the rarity in their gardens: Gerard notes that he had lilacs growing “in very great plenty” in 1597, but lilacs were not mentioned by Shakespeare, and John Loudon was of the opinion that the Persian lilac had been introduced into English gardens by John Tradescant the elder. Tradescant's Continental source for information on the lilac , and perhaps ultimately for the plants, was Pietro Andrea Mattioli, as one can tell from a unique copy of Tradescant's plant list in his Lambeth garden, an adjunct of his Musaeum Tradescantianum; it was printed, though probably not published, in 1634: it lists Lilac Matthioli. That Tradescant's "lilac of Mattioli's" was a white one is shown by Elias Ashmole's manuscript list, Trees found in Mrs Tredescants Ground when it came into my possession (1662): "Syringa alba".
In the American colonies lilacs were introduced in the eighteenth century. Peter Collinson, F.R.S., wrote to the Pennsylvania gardener and botanist John Bartram, proposing to send him some, and remarked that John Custis of Virginia had a fine "collection", which Ann Leighton interpreted as signifying Common and Persian Lilacs, in both purple and white, "the entire range of lilacs possible" at the time.
This text is from wikipedia Syringa vulgaris

Lilacs at Engarn.



Read about more great ABC Wednesday's S here.
Have a great Wednesday my friends!
LOLove Tyra

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20 comments:

gittan said...

Underbara är domverkligen! Jag saknar mina, men får njuta av doften från grannens istället. Man kan ju inte ha allt / gittan

NatureStop said...

Such refreshing pics...we can actually smell the beautiful lilacs in your garden:)

Tyra in Vaxholm said...

Hejsan Gittan, vet du jag hade tänkt att säga i inlägget att praktiskt taget alla trädgårdar har en syrén...grannens funkar också :-)

mvh Tyra

Yolanda Elizabet Heuzen said...

Over here we call them Seringen, not all that different from the Swedish word for them. They are great, aren't they? I bought one last week, a tiny one that will stay tiny although its scent is huge!!!!

BTW I think you don't want to miss today's post on Bliss as there are many pics of Miss Tara. ;-)

Carol said...

Lovely! May your weather stay cool so they last a long time for you! Thanks too for sharing the history.

RuneE said...

Jeg misunner deg de vakre syrinene. Nyt dem nå. Vi har en, og den har det ikke bra. Står nok for grunt.

Sylvia K said...

Beautiful pics! I love lilacs! We have one in our backyard and there are lots of them in our neighborhood. The air is sweet with their fragrance! Love the greenhouse, too! Happy ABC Wednesday!

Leslie: said...

How beautiful - one of my favourite flowers! :D

Willow said...

Lilacs really are lovely. The first time I noticed them was when I was a young married woman living in Chicago. All the lilacs bloomed in May.

jay said...

I'm very fond of lilac, and we plan to put one in when the garden landscaping is done! I like the common lilac colour, or white, but not the fancy blues and reds. Love the scent too!

spacedlaw said...

I love lilac, it's a smell I associate with my childhood.

kadermo said...

Det är en udnerbar tid nu - att strosa runt i villaträdgårdanra och sniffa syrendoft.

Rose said...

There is nothing quite so lovely as the scent of lilacs blooming--to me, it's the epitome of spring. Thanks for all the great information about them; I just assumed they were natives here in the US. It seems as though every farm in this area has several old lilacs.

Anna said...

It must be a pleasure for you to mow the lawn at this time of year Tyra and not a chore ! I really enjoyed reading about the history of the lilac. I had not realised that it is not one of the many plants mentioned by Shakespeare in his works. Most interesting. Thank you :)

Tumblewords: said...

Interesting post! We have lilacs here and syringa is the Idaho state flower. I'll have to check out the background there. Thanks!

Roses and Lilacs said...

Yes, lilacs one of my very favorites. Your white blooms are lovely. I don't have a white, just blues, purples and a dark reddish purple.

Your greenhouse is lovely. I haven't seen anything like that style in my area. Very unique.
Marnie

Catherine said...

Lovely captures of your beautiful lilac's Tyra! I love the first photo of your beautiful greenhouse!
I too love mowing the grass~ enjoyin the scents and sounds in the garden in the evening! ~Life's simple pleasures! :)
Enjoy your day!
Cat

marmee said...

lilacs are just wonderful to have and get to cut and bring that fragrance in the house...ours are long gone.

Roses and stuff said...

Syrenernas tid är den allra vackraste, tycker jag!
katarina

Andre2812 said...

Absolutely beautiful and inspirational to. Driveways Edinburgh